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28% don’t want coronavirus lockdown eased even if tests are passed

More than a quarter of Britons do not want coronavirus lockdown eased even if the government’s five tests are passed, according to a poll today.

The problem faced by ministers when they do decide the shackles can be loosened have been underlined by signs that the public support for the curbs is entrenched.

Research by YouGov found 28 per cent want the lockdown to stay in full even if the conditions set for starting to return to normal life are met.   

Some 22 per cent would like to see more shops open, 11 per cent schools up and running, and a tenth say regions should be released at different times. 

Just 4 per cent want the lockdown lifted entirely, according to the survey for the Times.  

Research by YouGov for the Times found 28 per cent want the lockdown to stay in full even if the conditions set for starting to return to normal life are met

Research by YouGov for the Times found 28 per cent want the lockdown to stay in full even if the conditions set for starting to return to normal life are met

Research by YouGov for the Times found 28 per cent want the lockdown to stay in full even if the conditions set for starting to return to normal life are met

Boris Johnson (pictured leading the nation's silence for frontline victims of coronavirus yesterday) has promised to be 'transparent' about a blueprint to loosen the coronavirus lockdown after returning to work

Boris Johnson (pictured leading the nation's silence for frontline victims of coronavirus yesterday) has promised to be 'transparent' about a blueprint to loosen the coronavirus lockdown after returning to work

Boris Johnson (pictured leading the nation’s silence for frontline victims of coronavirus yesterday) has promised to be ‘transparent’ about a blueprint to loosen the coronavirus lockdown after returning to work  

Despite Downing Street insisting that curbs remain in place until at least May 7 there are signs that the rules are already being relaxed in the face of growing Tory alarm over the economic impact.

New guidance is being issued to councils on refuse and recycling sites, while Michael Gove gave a strong hint that garden centres and other shops where social distancing can be most enforced could follow soon.

Some construction sites, DIY stores and fast food chains have also stepped up their operations over recent days.  

Speculation was fuelled last night as the wording of the government’s ‘five tests’ for easing restrictions was subtly changed. 

Slides displayed at the daily No10 briefing held by Matt Hancock showed that it is now saying there must be no second peak ‘that overwhelms the NHS’.

That is potentially more achievable than avoiding a second peak altogether – although Downing Street insisted there had been no adjustment. 

Frantic work has been going on behind the scenes to produce an exit plan, although officials are adamant nothing will be announced formally this week.  

Ideas being mooted include letting family and friends mix in ‘bubbles’ of 10 people rather than just households. 

The government’s key ‘stay at home’ message is expected to be overhauled to make clear people should do their jobs wherever possible. 

Travellers are likely to be urged to wear makeshift face coverings on the train, tube and bus – after Nicola Sturgeon broke ranks with the rest of the UK by changing the advice to Scots. No10 says it is not immediately proposing to change the guidance.    

A separate Ipsos MORI poll yesterday found 70 per cent of the public believed convinced restrictions should not be eased until the deadly disease has been ‘fully contained’. 

Support for the restrictions is stronger in the UK than 13 other major economies struggling to cope with outbreaks of the disease, the research found. 

The wording of the fifth test presented at the daily briefing last night (top) was subtly different to that from yesterday (bottom)

The wording of the fifth test presented at the daily briefing last night (top) was subtly different to that from yesterday (bottom)

The wording of the fifth test presented at the daily briefing last night (top) was subtly different to that from yesterday (bottom)

Support for the lockdown in stronger in the UK than 14 other major economies struggling to cope with outbreaks of the disease, the Ipsos MORI research found

Support for the lockdown in stronger in the UK than 14 other major economies struggling to cope with outbreaks of the disease, the Ipsos MORI research found

Support for the lockdown in stronger in the UK than 14 other major economies struggling to cope with outbreaks of the disease, the Ipsos MORI research found

 

 

Courtesy DAILY MAIL

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