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Ant Middleton reveals how he separated home life from his military career

Ant Middleton has revealed how he managed to separate his home life from past his military career.

Speaking as the Guest Editor for the June edition of Men’s Health, the SAS: Who Dares Wins star, 39, admitted he would burn letters from his family in a bid to cope with being away from his loved ones. 

The ex-soldier, who displayed his washboard abs in the publication’s accompanying images, also shed light on his experience with overcoming negativity after facing backlash for refusing to accept coronavirus as a threat.

Unconventional method: Ant Middleton has revealed how he managed to separate his home life from past his military career for the June edition of Men’s Health

Unconventional method: Ant Middleton has revealed how he managed to separate his home life from past his military career for the June edition of Men’s Health

Unconventional method: Ant Middleton has revealed how he managed to separate his home life from past his military career for the June edition of Men’s Health

Ant joined the British Army aged 17 in 1997 before he served in the Royal Marines from 2005 until 2012. 

The media personality has shared the unconventional method he took to stay focused during tense missions. 

‘When I was in the military and on operations, I wouldn’t read any letters from my wife and family. I’d burn them’, Ant candidly said. 

‘I didn’t need that in my head. I wanted to be totally focused on the job and to do it to my best ability. And then I could get back to them.

'You tackle negativity with positivity' The Who Dares Wins star, 39, also shed light on overcoming negativity after facing backlash for refusing to accept coronavirus as a threat

'You tackle negativity with positivity' The Who Dares Wins star, 39, also shed light on overcoming negativity after facing backlash for refusing to accept coronavirus as a threat

‘You tackle negativity with positivity’ The Who Dares Wins star, 39, also shed light on overcoming negativity after facing backlash for refusing to accept coronavirus as a threat

'I didn’t need that in my head': The ex-soldier admitted he would burn letters from his family to cope with being away from them (pictured with his wife and their four kids)

'I didn’t need that in my head': The ex-soldier admitted he would burn letters from his family to cope with being away from them (pictured with his wife and their four kids)

‘I didn’t need that in my head’: The ex-soldier admitted he would burn letters from his family to cope with being away from them (pictured with his wife and their four kids)

‘The best educator is life experience. I’m not an intellectual – everything I’ve learned has been through action.’ 

The hardman shares Shyla, 12, Gabriel, 11, Priseis, four and Bligh, three, with his wife of nearly 14 years, Emilie, and an older son from a previous relationship.

Stressing the importance of maintaining a healthy work-life balance, he said: ‘When I do my work, I am 100% work. When I’m being a husband, I am 100% a husband. It allows me to be the best me. When I’m away from the family, I see it as a short-term sacrifice.’ 

Last month, the Mutiny captain sparked outrage for announcing he’s refusing to accept COVID-19 as a threat before the UK’s lockdown was introduced in the fight against the growing pandemic, which has currently claimed over 26,000 lives in the UK alone.

Happy family: The hardman shares Shyla, 12, Gabriel, 11, Priseis, four and Bligh, three, with his wife of nearly 14 years, Emilie, and an older son from a previous relationship (pictured)

Happy family: The hardman shares Shyla, 12, Gabriel, 11, Priseis, four and Bligh, three, with his wife of nearly 14 years, Emilie, and an older son from a previous relationship (pictured)

Happy family: The hardman shares Shyla, 12, Gabriel, 11, Priseis, four and Bligh, three, with his wife of nearly 14 years, Emilie, and an older son from a previous relationship (pictured)

'The best educator is life experience': The media personality joined the British Army aged 17 in 1997 before he served in the Royal Marines from 2005 until 2012

'The best educator is life experience': The media personality joined the British Army aged 17 in 1997 before he served in the Royal Marines from 2005 until 2012

‘The best educator is life experience’: The media personality joined the British Army aged 17 in 1997 before he served in the Royal Marines from 2005 until 2012

Controversial: Last month, the Mutiny captain sparked outrage for announcing he's refusing to accept COVID-19 as a threat before the UK's lockdown was introduced

Controversial: Last month, the Mutiny captain sparked outrage for announcing he's refusing to accept COVID-19 as a threat before the UK's lockdown was introduced

Controversial: Last month, the Mutiny captain sparked outrage for announcing he’s refusing to accept COVID-19 as a threat before the UK’s lockdown was introduced 

In an Instagram post, the adventurer said: ‘Am I still out travelling the world? Yes. Am I still shaking hands? Yes. Am I still cuddling fans at the airport? Yes. Am I washing my hands and keeping my hygiene to a high standard as always? Yes.

‘Has my life changed? No. Am I going to let some disease, COVID-19, dictate my life? Absolutely not. Get out there, don’t change, F**k COVID-19!’ 

The TV star has since spoken about battling negative comments, insisting he tackles criticism with ‘positivity’.

He told the publication: ‘When an unfavourable situation comes along, you can’t counter negativity with negativity. It’s a double negative. It’s simple science. You’ll end up one way very quickly, and that’s down.

'You’ll end up one way very quickly, and that’s down': The TV star has since spoken about battling negative comments, insisting he tackles criticism with 'positivity'

'You’ll end up one way very quickly, and that’s down': The TV star has since spoken about battling negative comments, insisting he tackles criticism with 'positivity'

‘You’ll end up one way very quickly, and that’s down’: The TV star has since spoken about battling negative comments, insisting he tackles criticism with ‘positivity’

‘You have to tackle negativity with positivity, whether that’s a situation or a person. And if you can’t deal with it, you need to cut it out of your life. Because, otherwise, it’s just going to engulf you.’

On owning up to his mistakes, Ant elaborated: ‘Mistakes happen, and we all make them. What’s important, though, is that you own your mistakes – acknowledge them, instead of running away from them. 

Available: The full interview appears in the June issue of Men’s Health, on sale now

Available: The full interview appears in the June issue of Men’s Health, on sale now

Available: The full interview appears in the June issue of Men’s Health, on sale now

‘You need to learn from the mistakes you make in your life. By doing that, you can emerge from the situation and harness it to make yourself a better version of you for the future.

‘It’s important to push your fears. But remember, they are individual to you. Do not compare yourself to other people. Don’t let anyone or anything else define who you are.’ 

TV’s tough guy has been vocal about his thoughts on mental resilience – the ability to cope with an issue and return to a pre-crisis state.

On the significance of the method, he said: ‘Society wants you in a box. We’re more closed off than ever. We’re not free! But we can be. I know what I am and I’m happy. Mental resilience means being happy with who you are. 

‘Risk is growth. Failure is growth. Everyone should keep testing themselves. I’ve tested myself multiple times, to the point of near-death.’   

The full interview appears in the June issue of Men’s Health, on sale now. 

Pack a punch: The heavily-tattooed star displayed his washboard abs and toned upper body in the publication's accompanying images

Pack a punch: The heavily-tattooed star displayed his washboard abs and toned upper body in the publication's accompanying images

Pack a punch: The heavily-tattooed star displayed his washboard abs and toned upper body in the publication’s accompanying images

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