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Democrat governors resist Trump’s calls to ‘liberate’ amid huge protests

The Democratic governors from Minnesota, Washington and New York are resisting Donald Trump’s calls to ‘liberate’ their states and slammed the president for his encouragement of protesters who have flouted social distancing rules and taken to the streets to demand lockdowns end. 

Minnesota’s Democratic Governor Walz clapped back at Trump’s call to ‘liberate’ the state Friday, by saying it will ‘probably take longer than a two-word tweet’ to make sure he can fully reopen it, after protesters staged an anti-lockdown rally outside his mansion. 

Walz slammed Trump during a press conference Friday after the president tried to make himself the star of the ‘lockdown rebellion’ by tweeting ‘Liberate Minnesota’ on Friday as protesters carrying Trump 2020 paraphernalia descended on the governor’s official residence.   

This came after Washington Governor Jay Inslee launched a scathing condemnation of the president’s show of support for the protesters and accused him of ‘fomenting domestic rebellion’ in a Twitter thread Friday.

New York’s Andrew Cuomo, who has consistently locked heads with the president in recent weeks, also unloaded on Trump on live television Friday, mocking his demand for gratitude for federal help and saying: ‘Thank you for doing your job’.  

Cuomo followed this up with another swipe in his Saturday briefing where he recited Lincoln’s famous quote – ‘a house divided itself cannot stand’ – and said there is ‘no time for politics’.

Democrat governors have increasingly clashed with Trump, particularly after his head-snapping week which saw him first proclaim ‘total authority’ to decide on re-opening the country, then do a total u-turn and say states ‘call the shots.’ 

The president tried to make himself the star of the 'lockdown rebellion' by tweeting 'LIBERATE Minnesota' as protesters carrying Trump 2020 paraphernalia descended on the governor's official residence

The president tried to make himself the star of the 'lockdown rebellion' by tweeting 'LIBERATE Minnesota' as protesters carrying Trump 2020 paraphernalia descended on the governor's official residence

The president tried to make himself the star of the ‘lockdown rebellion’ by tweeting ‘LIBERATE Minnesota’ as protesters carrying Trump 2020 paraphernalia descended on the governor’s official residence

Walz said during Friday’s briefing he had tried to call Trump after his ‘Liberate Minnesota’ tweet Friday, but the president did not return his call.   

Walz said he called to ask Trump: ‘What are we doing differently about moving towards getting as many people back into the workforce without compromising the health of Minnesotans or the providers?

He said the president had not gotten back to him, before making a dig that it ‘will probably take longer than a two-word tweet.’

Trump tweeted the two words Friday in which he appeared to side with Republican protesters who are flouting social distancing rules by gathering in the streets demanding the state reopens – one day after the president said he would leave the decision to reopen states in the hands of the individual governors. 

Trump tweeted the two words Friday in which he appeared to side with Republican protesters who are flouting social distancing rules by gathering in the streets demanding the state reopens - one day after he said he would leave the decision to reopen states in the hands of the individual governors

Trump tweeted the two words Friday in which he appeared to side with Republican protesters who are flouting social distancing rules by gathering in the streets demanding the state reopens - one day after he said he would leave the decision to reopen states in the hands of the individual governors

Trump tweeted the two words Friday in which he appeared to side with Republican protesters who are flouting social distancing rules by gathering in the streets demanding the state reopens – one day after he said he would leave the decision to reopen states in the hands of the individual governors

The president followed his 'Liberate Minnesota' tweet with at attack on the Democratic governor of Michigan

The president followed his 'Liberate Minnesota' tweet with at attack on the Democratic governor of Michigan

Then the president said that Michigan and Virginia, two more states under Democratic control, should also be liberated, adding in Virginia that the 2nd Amendment needed to be 'saved'

Then the president said that Michigan and Virginia, two more states under Democratic control, should also be liberated, adding in Virginia that the 2nd Amendment needed to be 'saved'

Then he said that Michigan and Virginia, two more states under Democratic control, should also be liberated, adding in Virginia that the 2nd Amendment needed to be ‘saved’

The president followed it up with similar tweets for Michigan and Virginia in a show of support for the largely Republican demonstrators against the stay-at-home restrictions.

All three states that Trump singled out have Democratic governors – and are potentially swing states in the 2020 election. 

Protesters began taking to the streets this week to demand governors rethink the restrictions in various states after the sweeping stay-at-home orders shuttered businesses, disrupted lives and decimated the economy.  

Around 400 protesters descended on Walz’s St. Paul residence in Minnesota Thursday and Friday demanding an end to the state’s stay-at-home orders.  

Many of them were sporting ‘Make America Great Again’ hats, waved American flags, and held signs saying ‘We do not consent’ and ‘Walz is the virus’, while ignoring coronavirus social distancing guidelines and not wearing masks. 

Walz slammed the actions of protesters and urged them to social distance.

‘If they’re protesting staying at home, they’re protesting first responders too,’ he said. 

Minnesota's Democratic Governor Tim Walz clapped back at Donald Trump's call to 'liberate' the state by saying it will 'probably take longer than a two-word tweet' to make sure he can fully reopen it

Minnesota's Democratic Governor Tim Walz clapped back at Donald Trump's call to 'liberate' the state by saying it will 'probably take longer than a two-word tweet' to make sure he can fully reopen it

Washington Governor Jay Inslee launched a scathing condemnation of the president's show of support for the protesters and accused him of 'fomenting domestic rebellion'

Washington Governor Jay Inslee launched a scathing condemnation of the president's show of support for the protesters and accused him of 'fomenting domestic rebellion'

Minnesota’s Democratic Governor Tim Walz (left) and Washington Governor Jay Inslee (right) both slammed Trump Friday over his encouragement of protesters who have taken to the streets to demand state lockdowns end

Walz announced a new executive order Friday to relax some of Minnesota’s lockdown rules around outdoor recreation but said it was not safe to bring an end to the lockdown altogether.

From Saturday morning, bait shops, outdoor shooting ranges, game farms, public and private parks and trails, golf courses, driving ranges and marina services can all reopen. 

Stores selling outdoor equipment, campgrounds, charter boats and equipment rentals firms must stay closed. 

Residents must still follow social distancing guidelines and stay near their homes when doing outdoor recreation. 

‘It’s important for us to stay active and enjoy the outdoors while preventing the spread of COVID-19,’ Walz said. 

‘This measure will allow Minnesotans to take advantage of more opportunities to get outside, while still doing their part to keep their neighbors healthy.’  

Washington Governor Inslee, whose state had the first case of coronavirus, the first deaths, and the first restrictions, launched a lengthy broadside against Trump Friday, calling his tweets 'unhinged rantings,' and accusing him of risking violence

Washington Governor Inslee, whose state had the first case of coronavirus, the first deaths, and the first restrictions, launched a lengthy broadside against Trump Friday, calling his tweets 'unhinged rantings,' and accusing him of risking violence

Washington Governor Inslee, whose state had the first case of coronavirus, the first deaths, and the first restrictions, launched a lengthy broadside against Trump Friday, calling his tweets ‘unhinged rantings,’ and accusing him of risking violence

The governor added that he was ‘frustrated too’ that the state cannot fully reopen but pointed to the number of coronavirus cases and deaths among Minnesotans.

As of Friday, there were 2,071 confirmed cases and 111 deaths across the state.

‘I’m frustrated too,’ he said. ‘If we could open up tomorrow we would.’  

Washington Governor Inslee, whose state had the first case of coronavirus, the first deaths, and the first restrictions, launched a lengthy broadside against Trump Friday, calling his tweets ‘unhinged rantings,’ and accusing him of risking violence. 

The Washington governor said: ‘The president’s statements this morning encourage illegal and dangerous acts. 

‘He is putting millions of people in danger of contracting COVID-19. His unhinged rantings and calls for people to ‘liberate’ states could also lead to violence.’

He called the tweets ‘fomenting domestic rebellion and spreading lies’ and said they were in contrast to the ‘sensible’ guidelines Trump had unveiled Thursday on re-opening the economy.

Protesters began taking to the streets this week to demand governors rethink the restrictions in various states after the sweeping stay-at-home orders shuttered businesses, disrupted lives and decimated the economy

Protesters began taking to the streets this week to demand governors rethink the restrictions in various states after the sweeping stay-at-home orders shuttered businesses, disrupted lives and decimated the economy

Protesters began taking to the streets this week to demand governors rethink the restrictions in various states after the sweeping stay-at-home orders shuttered businesses, disrupted lives and decimated the economy

Around 400 protesters descended on Walz's St. Paul residence in Minnesota Thursday and Friday demanding an end to the state's stay-at-home order

Around 400 protesters descended on Walz's St. Paul residence in Minnesota Thursday and Friday demanding an end to the state's stay-at-home order

Around 400 protesters descended on Walz’s St. Paul residence in Minnesota Thursday and Friday demanding an end to the state’s stay-at-home order

But he suggested Trump was not the master of the plan, saying ‘Trump slowly read his script,’ and added: ‘Less than 24 hours later, the president is off the rails. He’s not quoting scientists and doctors but spewing dangerous, anti-democratic rhetoric.’ 

And he warned: ‘His words are likely to cause COVID-19 infections to spike in places where social distancing is working — and if infections are increasing in those places, that will further postpone the 14 days of decline that his own guidance says is necessary before modifying any interventions.’ 

It was New York Governor Andrew Cuomo‘s turn to take another swipe at Trump on Saturday when he channeled Abraham Lincoln saying there’s ‘no time for politics’ and urged for the US to unite in its fight against the pandemic.  

There’s been no love lost between the New York governor and the president throughout the pandemic.

Speaking in his daily press briefing, Cuomo made a series of thinly-veiled digs at Trump, in which he recited Lincoln’s famous quote – ‘a house divided itself cannot stand’.  

‘The house can also not stand up and rise against a situation as bad as we’ve seen since World War Two,’ Cuomo said.

‘That’s why we’re called the “United” States and the “United” is key.’   

Cuomo reinforced his previous claims that he is not politically motivated and said politics need to be left out of the crisis. 

After several weeks of locking heads with Donald Trump, Cuomo made yet another thinly-veiled dig at the president and his response to the pandemic telling him 'there's no time for politics' as Americans are dying

After several weeks of locking heads with Donald Trump, Cuomo made yet another thinly-veiled dig at the president and his response to the pandemic telling him 'there's no time for politics' as Americans are dying

After several weeks of locking heads with Donald Trump, Cuomo made yet another thinly-veiled dig at the president and his response to the pandemic telling him ‘there’s no time for politics’ as Americans are dying

‘In the midst of this there is no time for politics. How does the situation get worse? If you politicise it,’ he said. 

‘I have no political agenda and I’ve stayed 100 miles away from politics just so people know.’  

His comments come after he blasted the president Friday, mocking his demand for gratitude for federal help and saying: ‘Thank you for doing your job’.    

Trump had taken to Twitter to accuse Cuomo of ‘complaining’ – and suggested Cuomo failed to take advantage of federal help. 

‘We built you thousands of hospital beds that you didn’t need or use,’ Trump fumed.

Cuomo responded in an extended monologue during his daily press conference Friday: ‘Show gratitude. How any times do you want me to say thank you? I’m saying ‘thank you’ for doing your job.’ 

‘This was your role as president, okay?’ he said.  

‘You want me to say thank you? Thank you for doing your job in helping fill Javits [convention center] … Thank you for participating in a modicum of federal responsibility in a national crisis – which you know is a national crisis because he declared a federal emergency,’ Cuomo said, speaking as if directly to the president.

‘Thank you again Mr. President for the Javits. Thank you for the U.S. Navy ship Comfort – which by the way is just doing your job as president. It’s not really “thank you” like you wrote a check yourself. But thank you for that,’ he said. 

Cuomo was referencing the USNS Comfort, which has taken on a limited number of patients.  

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer said Friday she hoped the president was ‘not encouraging more protests’ after the state has drawn some of the largest protests from constituents complaining the stay at home orders have trampled on their liberty.

On Wednesday, thousands of protesters showed up to Michigan’s state capitol in their vehicles to demonstrate against Whitmer’s order – the strictest in the nation. 

People take part in a protest for "Michiganders Against Excessive Quarantine" at the Michigan State Capitol in Lansing, Michigan on Wednesday

People take part in a protest for "Michiganders Against Excessive Quarantine" at the Michigan State Capitol in Lansing, Michigan on Wednesday

People take part in a protest for ‘Michiganders Against Excessive Quarantine’ at the Michigan State Capitol in Lansing, Michigan on Wednesday

Protesters stand outside the Ohio Statehouse during the state of Ohio's coronavirus response update on Monday

Protesters stand outside the Ohio Statehouse during the state of Ohio's coronavirus response update on Monday

Protesters stand outside the Ohio Statehouse during the state of Ohio’s coronavirus response update on Monday

WHAT DO ‘LIBERATE’ TARGETS HAVE IN COMMON? 

Donald Trump tweeted support for protests in three states: Michigan, Minnesota, and Virginia.

Each of them have personal animus for Trump.

Michigan

Trump’s path to election success in 2016 ran through Michigan, which he won by 10,704 votes. Failing to keep Michigan might not be a fatal blow but it would make his path to re-election even more difficult. Its Democratic governor, Gretchen Whitmer has been discussed as a possible Joe Biden running mate, so disrupting her handling of the coronavirus crisis could help on a national scale too.

Minnesota

Trump came close to flipping the state in 2016, losing by just 44,765 votes in what has been a long-reliable Democratic state. Trump has nursed a belief he can flip it this time, holding rallies there when he has ignored other blue states. Senator Amy Klobuchar is another possible Biden running mate and associating her with problems over the coronavirus crisis could be electorally useful.

Virginia

The Washington D.C. suburbs have turned a once-reliable Republican territory into fairly certain Democratic territory in 2020. In 2018, Democrats’ suburban wave put them in charge of the governor’s mansion and the capitol and Republicans lost Congressional seats. Trump is considered unlikely to be competitive in a state trending from purple to blue but the Democratic takeover of the state across the Potomac has weighed on his party and if he can at least reverse the Congressional wave, his ambition of flipping back the House in 2020 would come closer. 

Whitmer has banned residents from visiting their neighbors and has told large retailers to close off sections dedicated to home improvement goods.

The protest – called Operation Gridlock – was devised by the Michigan Conservative Coalition and the Michigan Freedom Fund, which is linked to the family of Trump’s Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

It featured some of the elements of a Trump campaign rally including ‘lock her up’ chants and large Trump 2020 flags. 

Some protesters also brought Confederate flags, despite Michigan being part of the Union during the Civil War.

Whitmer said she empathized with residents’ concerns but urged people to ‘be smart’ as the US continues to fight the deadly pandemic.   

‘People are feeling very anxious, you know?’

‘The last thing I want to do is have a second wave here, so we’ve got to be really smart,’ she said.

She also responded to another planned protest, which is supposed to take place next Wednesday.

‘I totally respect people’s right to dissent and voice their disagreement with decisions I’ve made,’ she said. ‘If people are going to come to town I ask them that they do so that keeps themselves safe and others as well.’ 

Whitmer did say Friday morning, however, that she hoped she would be able to open a part of the Michigan economy by May 1 – the day that Trump has been touting, as it marks the expiration of the ’30 Days to Slow the Spread’ federal guidelines.

‘I do hope to have some relaxing come May 1st, but it’s two weeks away, and the information, the data and our ability to test is changing so rapidly,’ she said.   

Several Republican governors have also refused to bow to pressure to rush to reopen their states, as the US death toll from the pandemic continues to surge.    

In Mississippi, Republican Governor Tate Reeves said it was too early for his state to reopen Friday, but told residents it would be for just one more week as he relaxed some of the rules around non-essential businesses.  

Reeves said the shelter-in-place order must continue for seven more days until April 27 saying ‘we’re just not there yet.’

The shelter in place order was due to finish Monday.  

Clothing stores, florists, athletics stores, salons and other non-essential businesses can now reopen for curbside or delivery sales.

‘We are easing the brakes on ‘non-essential’ businesses. I wanted to announce that we can all ease up and re-open today, but we can’t. We are still in the eye of the storm,’ Reeves said. 

‘We are going to allow drive-thru, curbside or delivery sales by ‘non-essential’ businesses. Clothing stores, florists or athletic goods can do safe sales. If a salon, or other business, wants to safely sell their excess supplies to stay afloat, they can do that. Call ahead, or order online, then safely pick it up.’

‘We are headed toward reopening. It is coming soon. There is light at the end of the tunnel,’ Reeves said. 

‘Please stay strong. Please stay smart. Use common sense. That’s the single most important thing you can do.’ 

Mississippi has over 3,000 confirmed cases and more than 120 deaths from coronavirus.

States have so far given a mixed response to easing lockdown rules, after Trump on Thursday gave governors his roadmap for a phased reopening of the devastated national economy.  

The new three-phase guidelines are aimed at easing restrictions in areas with low transmission of the coronavirus, while holding the line in harder-hit locations like New York.  

Republican Mississippi Governor Reeves also said it was too early for his state to reopen Friday, but told residents it would be for just one more week and relaxed some of the rules around non-essential businesses

Republican Mississippi Governor Reeves also said it was too early for his state to reopen Friday, but told residents it would be for just one more week and relaxed some of the rules around non-essential businesses

Republican Mississippi Governor Reeves also said it was too early for his state to reopen Friday, but told residents it would be for just one more week and relaxed some of the rules around non-essential businesses

Texas has become the first state to commit to partially reopening from April 20, while Michigan, Wisconsin and Idaho have all expressed plans to reopen in some form by May 1 when the federal guidelines for social distancing expire.  

Some states, like hard-hit New York, had already committed this week to extending lockdown measures into at least mid-May.   

Seven states – Arkansas, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, Wyoming – still have no stay-at-home orders in place for its residents. 

About 95 percent of the country currently remains on some form of lockdown in a bid to curb the spread of coronavirus.

Here’s where each state is with current lockdown measures and plans moving forward:   

Texas

Texas Governor Greg Abbott announced Friday plans to start reopening from April 20 – starting with public parks and retailers on a ‘to-go’ basis. 

New guidelines: 

From April 20: State parks will reopen. People must wear face coverings and masks and adhere to social distancing. People also cannot visit in groups of five or more

From April 22: Hospitals can start resuming surgeries that had been postponed by coronavirus but only if they do not take away from the hospital’s capacity to treat COVID-19 and if the hospital reserves 25 percent of its beds for COVID-19 patients. 

From April 24: Retailers can reopen but only if they can deliver their goods or services to people at home or in their cars to minimize contact. 

Schools and universities will remain closed for the rest of the year.

Previous guidelines that are still in place: 

Stay-at-home order still exists through April 30

10 person limit on gatherings

Air travelers flying to Texas from New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, California, Louisiana or Washington – or Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, Miami – must self-quarantine for 14 days

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Alabama

Stay-at-home order through April 30

10 person limit on gatherings

Non-essential businesses closed to the public

Restaurants and bars limited to take-out only

Alaska 

Indefinite stay-at-home order. 

10 person limit on gatherings.

Nonessential businesses are limited to minimum operations or remote work. 

Restaurants and bars limited to take-out only. 

Travelers from out of state must self-quarantine for 14 days.

Arizona 

Stay-at-home order through April 30 

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses are limited to minimum operations or remote work

Restaurants and bars limited to take-out only

Trump on Thursday gave governors a road map for recovering from the economic pain of the coronavirus pandemic, laying out 'a phased and deliberate approach' to restoring normal activity in places that have strong testing and are seeing a decrease in COVID-19 cases

Trump on Thursday gave governors a road map for recovering from the economic pain of the coronavirus pandemic, laying out 'a phased and deliberate approach' to restoring normal activity in places that have strong testing and are seeing a decrease in COVID-19 cases

Trump on Thursday gave governors a road map for recovering from the economic pain of the coronavirus pandemic, laying out ‘a phased and deliberate approach’ to restoring normal activity in places that have strong testing and are seeing a decrease in COVID-19 cases

Arkansas  

No state-wide stay-at-home order 

10 person limit on gatherings – doesn’t apply to unenclosed outdoor spaces or places of worship

Gym and entertainment venues closed, hotels and vacation rentals restricted to authorized guests

Restaurants and bars limited to take-out only 

California  

Indefinite stay-at-home order 

Gatherings in a single room or place prohibited

Nonessential businesses are limited to minimum operations or remote work

Restaurants and bars limited to take-out only

Colorado  

Stay-at-home order through April 26

Public and private gatherings of any number prohibited with limited exceptions

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

Restaurants and bars limited to takeout only

Connecticut 

Stay-at-home order through May 20 

Five person limit on social gatherings, 50-person limit for religious services 

Non-essential businesses must suspend all in-person operations

Out-of-state visitors strongly urged to self-quarantine

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Delaware  

Stay-at-home order through May 15 

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Visitors from out of state who aren’t just passing through must self-quarantine for 14 days 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Florida  

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis gave the all-clear for some beaches and parks to reopen from April 17 if it could be done safely 

Stay-at-home order through April 30 

No social gatherings public spaces – with religious exemptions

Nonessential services closed to the public – but gun stores remain open

Visitors from COVID-19 hot spots such as New York must self-quarantine for 14 days

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Georgia  

Shelter-in-place order until April 30

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Hawaii  

Stay-at-home order at least through April 30

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Visitors from out of state must self-quarantine for 14 days 

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Idaho 

Stay-at-home order through April 30 

Non-essential gatherings prohibited 

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Illinois

Stay-at-home order through at least April 30

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only 

Indiana  

Stay-at-home order through April 20, but likely to be extended 

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Iowa 

No stay-at-home order 

Nonessential businesses ordered to close until April 30 

10 person limit on gatherings 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only 

Kansas  

Stay-at-home order until May 3 

10 person limit on gatherings – exempting funerals and religious services with social distancing

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Residents who traveled to California, Florida, New York or Washington state after March 14, or visited Illinois or New Jersey after March 22, must self-quarantine for 14 days 

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Kentucky 

No stay-at-home order 

Mass gatherings prohibited, smaller gatherings allowed with social distancing 

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Visitors from out of state must self-quarantine for 14 days 

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Louisiana  

Stay-at-home order through April 30 

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Maine  

‘Stay healthy at home’ executive order through April 30 

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Visitors from out of state must self-quarantine for 14 days 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Maryland 

Indefinite stay-at-home order 

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Visitors from out of state must self-quarantine for 14 days 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Massachusetts  

Non-essential businesses closed through May 4 

10 person limit on gatherings 

Visitors from out of state advised to self-quarantine for 14 days 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Michigan

Stay-at-home order through April 30

Public gatherings prohibited – with religious exemptions  

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Minnesota   

Stay-at-home order through May 3

Entertainment and performance venues closed 

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only 

Mississippi  

Stay at home order through April 20

Schools closed through the end of the semester

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Missouri  

Stay Home Missouri’ order through April 24

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses must enforce social distancing  

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Montana  

Stay-at-home order through April 24

Nonessential social and recreational gatherings prohibited  

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Visitors from out of state must self-quarantine for 14 days 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Nebraska  

No stay-at-home order

Hair salons, tattoo parlors and strip clubs closed through May 31 

10 person limit on gatherings  

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Nevada 

Stay-at-home order through April 30.

10 person limit on gatherings

Recreational, entertainment and personal-care businesses closed, including casinos  

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

New Hampshire  

Stay-at-home order through May 4 

Nine person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

New Jersey  

Indefinite stay-at-home order

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential retail businesses must close bricks-and-mortar premises. Recreational and entertainment businesses also closed  

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

New Mexico  

Stay-at-home order through April 30  

Five person limit on gatherings in a single room

Nonessential businesses must suspend all in-person operations 

Arriving air travelers must self-quarantine for 14 days 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

New York  

Stay-at-home order through May 15

Nonessential gatherings prohibited   

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Masks must be worn in situations where social distancing is not possible

North Carolina 

Stay-at-home order through April 29

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

North Dakota  

No stay-at-home order

Schools, restaurants, fitness centers, movie theaters and salons closed

No state-wide directive on gatherings  

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Ohio   

Stay-at-home order through May 1

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Visitors from out of state must self-quarantine for 14 days 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Oklahoma  

‘Safer at Home’ order until April 30 for people over the age of 65 and other vulnerable residents

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses must suspend services 

Visitors arriving from New York, California, Louisiana and Washington must self-quarantine for 14 days 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Oregon  

Indefinite stay-at-home order

25 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Pennsylvania 

Stay-at-home order through April 30

Gatherings prohibited 

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Rhode Island  

Stay-at-home order through May 8 

Five person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Visitors from out of state must self-quarantine for 14 days 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

South Carolina 

‘State of Emergency’ executive order extended through at least April 27 

Three person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

South Dakota  

No stay-at-home order

Unnecessary gatherings of 10 or more prohibited

Tennessee 

Stay-at-home order through April 30

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Texas  

Stay-at-home order through April 30 

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Air travelers flying to Texas from New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, California, Louisiana or Washington – or Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, Miami – must self-quarantine for 14 days 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Utah  

No stay-at-home order

10 person limit on gatherings

Businesses must minimize face-to-face contact with high-risk employees  

Visitors from out of state must self-quarantine for 14 days 

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Vermont 

Stay-at-home order through May 15

10 person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Visitors from out of state must self-quarantine for 14 days 

 Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Virginia  

Stay-at-home order through June 10

Recreation and entertainment businesses closed through May 8 

10 person limit on gatherings 

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Washington 

Stay-at-home order through May 4

All gatherings for social, spiritual and recreational purposes are prohibited 

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work 

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

West Virginia  

Indefinite stay-at-home order

Five-person limit on gatherings

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Visitors from coronavirus hotspots must self-quarantine for 14 days 

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only

Wisconsin  

‘Safer at Home’ order prohibits all nonessential travel until May 26 

All public and private gatherings are prohibited with limited exceptions. 

Nonessential businesses limited to minimum operations or remote work

Self-quarantine recommended for out-of-state visitors 

Bars and restaurants limited to take-out only 

Wyoming 

No stay-at-home order – but social distancing restrictions through April 30

10 person limit on gatherings in a confined space

Restaurants and bars limited to take-out only 

Anyone entering the state except for essential work must quarantine for 14 days

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