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The super-stadiums around the globe that you may not have heard of

When it comes to consuming football – and sport in general for that matter – nothing can beat the experience of attending the beautiful game live and in person.

With football on hiatus following the outbreak of the coronavirus, many simply cannot wait until they can return to some of the most iconic stadiums. 

Supporters are counting down the days until the doors at the Nou Camp, San Siro and Old Trafford are reopened, continuing to take fans’ breaths away once again. 

The Nou Camp, home to Barcelona, is one of the world's most iconic football stadiums

The Nou Camp, home to Barcelona, is one of the world's most iconic football stadiums

The Nou Camp, home to Barcelona, is one of the world’s most iconic football stadiums

But the world outside of European football also has equally impressive structures that can rival the best – but where are they and why are they so impressive?

Here, Sportsmail has picked out eight of the world’s best stadiums that you may never have never heard of.

Michigan Stadium – Michigan, USA

Capacity: 107,601  

The Michigan Stadium – nicknamed ‘The Big House’ – is the third largest stadium in the world and is the home to the University of Michigan American football team, The Wolverines.

While it is predominantly used to host NCAA games, the 107,601-seater stadium has welcomed football’s biggest teams to play on its hallowed turf.

Manchester United, Real Madrid and Barcelona have all played at the ground over the last decade, with attendances reaching well over 100,000 people for each of their encounters.

The Michigan Stadium – nicknamed 'The Big House' – is the third largest stadium in the world

The Michigan Stadium – nicknamed 'The Big House' – is the third largest stadium in the world

The Michigan Stadium – nicknamed ‘The Big House’ – is the third largest stadium in the world

The 107,601-seater stadium is home to the University of Michigan American football team

The 107,601-seater stadium is home to the University of Michigan American football team

The 107,601-seater stadium is home to the University of Michigan American football team

Kaohsiung National Stadium – Kaohsiung, Taiwan 

Capacity: 55,000 

Designed by Japan’s Pritzker Prize-winning architect Toyo Ito, the National Stadium in Taiwan may not be the biggest on this list but it is certainly one of the most stunning.

The stadium’s semi spiral-shaped structure leaves it open at one end of the ground while it became the first stadium in the world to be totally self-sufficient off solar power.

The multi-purpose stadium was originally built to host the 2009 World Games but now regularly sees tens of thousands attend to watch Taiwanese football matches.

The Kaohsiung National Stadium was designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Toyo Ito

The Kaohsiung National Stadium was designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Toyo Ito

The Kaohsiung National Stadium was designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Toyo Ito

Salt Lake Stadium – Kolkata, India

Capacity: 85,000 

Originally built in 1984 before being renovated in 2011, the Salt Lake Stadium can accommodate up to a staggering 120,000 people – making it the second largest stadium in the world while it holds the title of being the biggest in India.

In 1997, it saw over 137,000 people walk through its doors to watch the Federation Cup semi-final clash between Mohun Bagan and East Bengal.

The stadium hosted the Under 17s World Cup final in 2017 that saw England crowned as champions after beating Spain 5-2. 

The Salt Lake Stadium in India can accommodate up to a staggering 120,000 people

The Salt Lake Stadium in India can accommodate up to a staggering 120,000 people

The Salt Lake Stadium in India can accommodate up to a staggering 120,000 people

Estadio Azteca – Mexico City, Mexico

Capacity: 87,523 

Home to Club America Cruz Azul and the Mexico national side, the Estadio Azteca is one of the more well known stadiums on this list considering it was the first ground to host two World Cup finals – in 1970 and again in 1986.

The stadium also played host to one of football’s most famous games when Diego Maradona scored both the ‘Goal of the Century’ and the ‘Hand of God’ goal against England in the World Cup quarter-finals in 1986. 

The ground has been renovated four times since it’s initial construction in 1961 and now has an official capacity of 87,523. 

The Estadio Azteca is home to Club America Cruz Azul and the Mexico national side

The Estadio Azteca is home to Club America Cruz Azul and the Mexico national side

The Estadio Azteca is home to Club America Cruz Azul and the Mexico national side

The ground has been renovated four times since it's initial construction in 1961

The ground has been renovated four times since it's initial construction in 1961

The ground has been renovated four times since it’s initial construction in 1961

Guangdong Olympic Stadium – Guangzhou, China

Capacity: 80,012 

After two years of construction, the Guangdong Olympic Stadium opened its doors in September 2001 to become China’s largest stadium by seating capacity.

Mainly used for football, the multi-purpose stadium has already hosted the 2010 Asian Games and was originally supposed to help host the 2008 Olympic Games until it was decided that Beijing National Stadium, also known as the ‘Bird’s Nest’, would instead be the Games’ centre-piece stadium. 

Both United and Chelsea have faced Guangzhou Pharmaceutical at the ground on pre-season tours in 2007 and 2008 respectively.

The Guangdong Olympic Stadium is China's largest stadium by seating capacity

The Guangdong Olympic Stadium is China's largest stadium by seating capacity

The Guangdong Olympic Stadium is China’s largest stadium by seating capacity

Gelora Bung Karno Stadium – Central Jakarta, Indonesia

Capacity: 77,193 

Located in central Jakarta in Indonesia, the Gelora Bung Karno stadium has stood since 1962 and is the third largest stadium in the whole of Asia.

Named after the country’s first president, Sukarno, the 77,193-capacity ground has played host to the 1962 Asian Games while it was also the stadium Muhammad Ali fought Rudie Lubbers in 1973 – a bout Ali dominated before being awarded a unanimous decision on points after 12 rounds. 

The Gelora Bung Karno stadium has stood since 1962 and is the third largest stadium in Asia

The Gelora Bung Karno stadium has stood since 1962 and is the third largest stadium in Asia

The Gelora Bung Karno stadium has stood since 1962 and is the third largest stadium in Asia

Bukit Jalil National Stadium – Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Capacity: 87,411 

With a capacity of 87,411, the Bukit Jalil National Stadium is the eighth largest football stadium in the whole world, while it takes the title for the sport’s largest ground in Southeast Asia.

The Malaysia national football team are one of the stadium’s main residents and often plays host to most national level football competition finals such as the Malaysia FA Cup, Malaysia Cup and other athletic events.

The Bukit Jalil National Stadium is the eighth largest football stadium in the whole world

The Bukit Jalil National Stadium is the eighth largest football stadium in the whole world

The Bukit Jalil National Stadium is the eighth largest football stadium in the whole world

Fireworks light the sky during the 2017 Southeast Asian Games opening ceremony

Fireworks light the sky during the 2017 Southeast Asian Games opening ceremony

Fireworks light the sky during the 2017 Southeast Asian Games opening ceremony

Rungrado 1st of May Stadium – Pyongyang, North Korea

Capacity: 150,000 

On to the largest football stadium in the world – the Rungrado 1st of May Stadium in Pyongyang, North Korea. 

Otherwise known as the May Day Stadium, the colossal structure is said to have a capacity of 150,000 people and is the home of the North Korea national side.

Along with football and athletic events, the stadium – which features a scalloped roof to resemble a magnolia blossom – also hosts shows and parades celebrating the country’s leader, Kim Jong-un. 

The Rungrado May Day Stadium in North Korea is regarded as the world's largest stadium

The Rungrado May Day Stadium in North Korea is regarded as the world's largest stadium

The Rungrado May Day Stadium in North Korea is regarded as the world’s largest stadium

Along with football, the stadium hosts parades celebrating country's leader, Kim Jong-un

Along with football, the stadium hosts parades celebrating country's leader, Kim Jong-un

Along with football, the stadium hosts parades celebrating country’s leader, Kim Jong-un

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