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We’re the new romantics!

Their ancestors were the Romantic poets and writers who revolutionised – and scandalised – British society 200 years ago.

Descendants of Mary and Percy Shelley, Lord Byron and William Wordsworth, they display creativity of their own.

The three were photographed for Tatler in celebration of their famous forebears – and their own accomplishments as a culture club dubbed the ‘New Romantics’. 

Pictured: Kitty Wordsworth

Pictured: Kitty Wordsworth

Pictured: William Wordsworth

Pictured: William Wordsworth

Kitty Wordsworth (left), a descendant of William Wordsworth (right), runs female-led theatre company Damsel Productions

Kitty Wordsworth runs female-led theatre company Damsel Productions. She loves her great-great-great-great uncle’s work, which often invokes the beauty and healing power of nature in poems such as I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud.

She admits he was not ‘the biggest feminist’ but jokes that Wordsworth would ‘be with Extinction Rebellion’ if he was alive in 2020. 

She is adamant, however, that it would be his sister Dorothy – a writer who acted as the poet’s scribe – ‘carrying the banners’.

Pictured: Charles Byron

Pictured: Charles Byron

Pictured: Lord Byron

Pictured: Lord Byron

Charles Byron (left), who runs a furniture business with his wife, jokes that following in the footsteps of his brilliant but scandalous ancestor Lord Byron (right) was not an option

Pictured: Jayna Cavendish

Pictured: Jayna Cavendish

Pictured: Percy Bysshe Shelley

Pictured: Percy Bysshe Shelley

Jayna Cavendish (left), 31, is descended from Percy Shelley (right) and his wife Mary, the daughter of pioneering women’s rights campaigner Mary Wollstonecraft

Jayna Cavendish, 31, is descended from Shelley and his wife Mary, the daughter of pioneering women’s rights campaigner Mary Wollstonecraft.

Miss Cavendish teaches yoga and plays, with her sister Bess, in a feminist band, AYA. 

She said of her relatives: ‘They’re just so cool. They had a huge impact on early feminist philosophies, which is such an amazing thing to feel connected to.’ 

Read the full feature in the June issue of Tatler, available via digital download and on news stands tomorrow

Read the full feature in the June issue of Tatler, available via digital download and on news stands tomorrow

Read the full feature in the June issue of Tatler, available via digital download and on news stands tomorrow

She said Shelley, whose best-known poems include Ozymandias, was a ‘bit of a tyrant’ but conveyed emotion and connection to nature. 

And wife Mary will be forever remembered for her remarkable novel, Frankenstein.

Charles Byron, who runs a furniture business with his wife, jokes that following in the footsteps of his brilliant but scandalous ancestor Lord Byron was not an option. 

‘I am no poet,’ he said. ‘I am, in fact, dyslexic.’

  • Read the full feature in the June issue of Tatler, available via digital download and on news stands tomorrow.

Courtesy DAILY MAIL

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